Award Winners

Calendar Year 2018

Brennan Ndiif Imaging Award Slides Michael Brennan

The Best Electron Microscopy Imaging Publication 2018 is awarded to Michael Brennan, a PhD candidate with Professor M. Kuno in the Department of Chemistry. Brennan and coworkers published a paper entitled “Crystal Strucutre of Individual CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocubes”.  

The exact crystal structure assumed by CsPbBr3 nanocubes (NCs) remains ambiguous, whether cubic or orthorhombic. Here the atomic structure of individual CsPbBr3 NCs is considered via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) defocus-series analyses. The technique entails acquiring lattice-resolved HRTEM images of individual NCs over progressive defocus values. CsPbBr3 NC atomic structure was evaluated by comparing acquired experimental data to simulated lattice-resolved images and corresponding Fourier transform patterns of both orthorhombic (Pnma) and cubic (Pm3̅ m) CsPbBr3 polymorphs. The analyses indicate that both polymorphs exist simultaneously for NCs with 10 nm edge lengths. When edge lengths are <5 nm, however, only cubic symmetry is observed signifying a potential size dependence to the crystal symmetry of CsPbBr3 NCs. Such structural measurements provide critical insight into elucidating the structure/(optical and electrical) function relationship of CsPbBr3 NCs.The study was published in Inorg. Chem. 2018, 58, 2, 1555-1560.

 

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The Best Biological Imaging Publication 2018 is awarded to Yide Zhang, a PhD candidate in the Department of Electrical Engineering under the direction of Dr.Scott Howard. Zhang and coworkers published a paper entitled “Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy by stepwise optical saturation”. 

This paper demonstrates true super-resolution microscopy using the NDIIF’s conventional fluorescence microscopes. Super-resolution microscopy is a ground breaking technology that allows researchers to see features smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Many techniques have been developed and used to produce significant biological results, and the impact of super-resolution microscopy was recognized in the awarding of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the first pioneers in the field. However, these techniques require expensive specialized equipment and can be limited to simple samples. This paper describes and demonstrates a method for achieving super-resolution imaging using commonly available microscopes in a way that allows for 3D super-resolution imaging in scattering tissue. Super-resolution in this paper is accomplished through a new understanding of how focused light interacts with saturable fluorophores. This means that anyone currently using conventional scanning fluorescence microscopy can use the technique to improve their resolution. This is the first demonstration of the technique which subsequently has been used to achieve the first ever super-resolution frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and long-term, 3D in vivo imaging of zebrafish neurons during spinal chord formation.The study was published in Biomed. Opt. Express 9, 1613-1629 (2018). 


Calendar Year 2017

Klymenko NeoplasiaslideYuliya Klymenko, Jeffrey Johnson, Brandi Box, Rachel Lombard, Leigh Campbell, Elizabeth Loughran, and M. Sharon Stack, "Heterogeneous Cadherin Expression and Multicellular Aggregate Dynamics in Ovarian Cancer Dissemination." Neoplasia, 2017, 19 (7): 549-563, DOI: 10.1016/j.neo.2017.04.002

The Best Electron Beam Imaging Publication 2017 is awarded to Dr. Yuliya Klymenko in the group of Professor Sharon Stack, Director of Harper Cancer Research Institute and Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Klymenko and coworkers published a paper entitled “Heterogeneous cadherin expression and multicellular aggregate dynamics in ovarian cancer dissemination”.  The study work used a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FEI Magellen)  and a Transmission Electron Microscope (JEOL 1400) to evaluate the contribution of cellular cadherin composition to MCA phenotype by visualizing surface topography of 3-dimensional MCA’s grown in vitro using the panel of EOC cell lines, with high resolution and magnification ranges. Using these images, they were able to identify striking cadherin-dependent differences in aggregate surface ultrastructure.  Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that MCA cadherin composition impacts intraperitoneal cell and MCA dynamics and thereby affects ultimate metastatic success.  The study was published in Neoplasia, 2017, 19 (7):549-63.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zartman HighresThe study was published in Biomedical Optics Express, 2017, 8 (8): 3671-3686 .Peter Höök, Teresa Brito-Robinson, Oleg Kim, Cody Narcisco, Holly V. Goodson, John W. Weisel, Mark S. Alber, and Jeremiah J. Zartman. "Whole Blood Clot Optical Clearning for Nondestructive 3D Imaging and Quantitative Analysis." Biomedical Optics Exp., 2017, 8 (8): 3671-3686, DOI: 10.1364/BOE.8.003671

The Best Biological Imaging Publication 2017 is awarded to Dr Jeremiah Zartman, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.  

Zartman and coworkers, including Professor Albers and Professor Goodson published a paper entitled “Whole blood clot optical clearing for nondestructive 3D imaging and quantitative analysis”. The study addressed an optimized optical clearing method termed cCLOT that renders large whole blood clots transparent and allows confocal fluorescence microscopy close to one millimeter inside the clot. Zartman validated the utility of cCLOT by demonstrating a quantitative structural difference in the fibrin network appearance when clot contraction is impaired pharmacologically with blebbistatin. The group also measured erythrocyte volumes at different depths inside clots and showed the volume remains the same during contraction, suggesting that contraction depends solely on reducing extracellular space.  This finding indicates that clot contraction is not due to osmotic changes in erythrocytes but rather due to a higher compaction of the cells.  


Calendar Year 2016

Four Examples from Ni/Al System imagesC. Shuck, J. Pauls and A. Mukasyan, "Ni/Al Energetic Nanocomposites and the Solid Flame Phenomenon." J. Phys. Chem. C, 2016, Volume 120, 27066-27078. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b009754

The Best Electron Beam Imaging Publication 2016 is awarded to Christopher Shuck, a graduate student working with Professor A. Mukasyan in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Shuck and coworkers published a paper entitled “Ni/Al Energetic Nanocomposites and the Solid Flame Phenomenon”. The study work used a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument to collect thousands of images of the nanocomposite Ni/Al system with nanometer accuracy. Using these images, the internal structure of the nanocomposite material was quantitatively analyzed using 3D reconstruction techniques. They determined surface contact between the reactants, layer thickness distributions, and then related them in a quantitative fashion to observed properties. The study was published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 2016, 120, 27066.


 

The Best Biological Imaging Publication 2016 is awarded to Dr. Eamonn Kennedy, apost-doctoral fellow collaborating with Professor G. Timp in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Biological Sciences.

P1 Alights K12E. Kennedy, E. Nelson, T. Tanaka, J. Damiano, and G. Timp. "Live Bacterial Physiology Visualized with 5nm Resolution Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy." ACS Nano, 2017, Volume 10, PP. 2669-2677. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano5b07697.

Kennedy and coworkers published a paper entitled “Live Bacterial Physiology Visualized with 5 nm Resolution Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy”. The study addressed a major limitation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that living cells cannot be maintained under the high vacuum imaging conditions. Combining live cell fluorescence microscopy with a new technique that permits TEM analysis within a sealed chamber of liquid held inside the Titan microscope, the team was able to visualize at nanometer resolution the infection of a living bacterial cell with bacteriophage virus without compromising cell viability. The study was published in ACS Nano, 2016, 10, 2669.E. Kennedy, Edward Nelson, T. Tanaka, J. Damiano, and G. Timp, "Live Bacterial Physiology Visualized with 5nm Resolution Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy, ACS Nano 2016, Volume 10, pp. 2669-2677. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b07697.


Calendar Year 2015

The Best Electron Microscopy Imaging Publication 2015 is awarded to Sara Fathipour, a graduate student with Professor A. Seabaugh in the Department of Electrical Engineering.

SS. Fathipour, M. Remskar, A. Varlec, A. Ajoy, R. Yan, S. Vishwanath, S. Rouvimov, W. S. Hwang, H. G. Xing, D. Jena and A. Seabaugh, “Synthesized multiwall MoS2 nanotube and nanoribbon field-effect transistors, “ Appl. Phys. Lett., 2015, Volume 106, 022114.

 

Fathipour and coworkers published a paper entitled “Synthesized Multiwall MoS2 Nanotube and Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors”.  Using advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy, the study revealed surprising physical attributes of MoS2 nanotubes grown by chemical vapor transport and used as the channel in field effect transistors. Instead of being cylindrical in geometry the tubes have an ellipsoidal cross section with a semimajor axis of ~60 nm, a semiminor axis of ~30 nm, and a bending radius on the order of 2 nm. The transistors have ON/OFF current ratios more than 20 x greater than MoS2 nanotubes field effect transistors grown by other methods. The study was published in Appl. Phys. Lett. 2015, 106, 022114.

The Best Biological Imaging Publication 2015 is awarded to Dr. Manuela Lahne, a Research Assistant Professor collaborating with Professor D. Hyde in the Department of Biological Sciences and the Center for Zebrafish Research.

MManuela Lahne, Jingling Li, Rebecca M. Marton, & David R. Hyde, “Actin-Cytoskeleton- and Rock-Mediated INM are required for Photoreceptor Regeneration in the Adult Zebrafish Retina.” J. Neurosci., 2015, Nov. 25;35(47):15612-34. Doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5005-14.2015.p

Lahne and coworkers published a paper entitled “Actin-Cytoskeleton- and Rock-Mediated INM Are Required for Photoreceptor Regeneration in the Adult Zebrafish Retina”. The study employed regular and multiphoton confocal cell microscopy to monitor in real time the behavior of Müller glia/neuronal progenitor cells in light damaged adult zebrafish retinal cultures. Continuous live cell imaging for several hours through the retinal thickness enabled observation of Müller glia/NPC nuclei migrating from the inner to the outer nuclear layer of the retina to divide before the majority of nuclei returned to the inner nuclear layer. The study was published in J. Neurosci. 2015, 35, 15612-34.

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Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility announces awards for best imaging publications


Calendar Year 2014

  • The Best Electron Microscopy Imaging Publication 2014 is awarded to Dr. Rajesh Sahadevan, a post-doctoral research associate with Professor W. A. Philip in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
  • The Best Biological Imaging Publication 2014 is awarded to Lisa Cole a graduate student with Professor R. K. Roeder in the Bioengineering Graduate Program, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, and a collaborator with Professor T. Vargo-Gogola in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend.

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Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility announces awards for best imaging publications


Calendar Year 2013

  • The 2013 Best Biological Imaging Publication was awarded to Giles E. Duffield, associate professor of biological sciences.
  • The 2013 Best Electron Microscopy Imaging Publication 2013 was awarded to Khachatur V. Manukyan, Ph.D., a post-doctoral research associate in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

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NDIIF announces awards for best imaging publications