VIDEO: Rooted in the Midwest, Notre Dame attracts Top Topology Researchers from around the Globe

Within the Department of Mathematics at the University of Notre Dame, researchers are exploring the intersection between math and physics, namely in the areas of topology and quantum field theory. With a historic legacy of research excellence in the field and a continued plan for growth, Notre Dame’s topologists are focusing on generating discoveries concerning the topological aspects of quantum field theories in order to fuel progress in topology and theoretical physics.

“Notre Dame has long had a strong group of topologists on campus,” said Stephan A. Stolz, Rev. John A. Zahm Professor of Mathematics. “That, combined with the fact that Notre Dame is in a fortunate physical position to easily collaborate with other excellent centers of topological research in the Midwest, as well as the University’s continued investment in hiring, means that the mathematical research of our faculty and graduate students will continue to flourish and grow here at Notre Dame. With our newest hires on board – and more to come – I look forward to seeing what the future of topology and quantum field theory research at Notre Dame brings.” 

Learn more about Notre Dame’s mathematical research in this new video, which features Mark Behrens, John and Margaret McAndrews Professor of Mathematics; Pavel Mnev, Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Andrew Putman, Professor of Mathematics; and Christopher Schommer-Pries, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.

To watch the video, which is part of the Advancing Research series, and learn more about Topology and Quantum Field Theory at Notre Dame, please click here.

The University of Notre Dame is a private research and teaching university inspired by its Catholic mission. Located in South Bend, Indiana, its researchers are advancing human understanding through research, scholarship, education, and creative endeavor in order to be a repository for knowledge and a powerful means for doing good in the world.

Originally published by Joanne Fahey at research.nd.edu on April 19, 2017.